Lectures

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Hudson Institute presents: Saudi Arabia in Crisis

15 Feb 2006 |
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The king of kings, Ghawar, the largest oilfield in the history of the world, has accounted for between 60% and 65% of Saudi Arabia’s output, so if anything went wrong with Ghawar then we have a problem in the world. All but two of these key fields were discovered long, long ago, and have been in production for a long, long period of time. They have all used intense water management to keep reservoir pressures high. So as the fields aged, they postponed that natural depletion that usually happens. Then you go to a secondary recovery.
Lester Brown

Lester Brown's address at Annual Gathering of Friends

15 Feb 2006
View all related to Climate Change | Habitat Destruction | Resource Depletion
But there are 2 new environmental trends, falling water tables and rising temperatures. These are trends that the worlds farmers have not had to deal with before but as the worlds demand for food has tripled over the last half century the demand for irrigation water has also tripled and in many parts of the world that has led to the over-pumping of aquifers. Half of the worlds people now live in countries where water tables are falling and wells are going dry and these countries include China, India and the United States.
Helena Norberg-Hodge

Helena Norberg-Hodge at CA Food Report Launch

14 Nov 2004 |
View all related to Climate Change | Food Security | Local Food
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But we need to think about the fact that one of the most difficult obstacles that we’re up against right now is that the same corporate middlemen that have ended up manipulating farmers and consumers are also manipulating the media and manipulating government regulation as well as deregulation at international levels. So we do need to look at this as a very, very central issue. Large corporations, and that includes banks and speculative investment, are actually controlling the information that gets out.
Percy Schmeiser

Percy Schmeiser lectures at CHFA Expo West

31 Dec 1969
View all related to Climate Change | Corporatism | GMO
I’m a grandfather, and we have to be concerned with the food we’re feeding to our children and our grandchildren. That’s why it’s so important we should work hard for labeling even in our country. Forty countries of the world have labeling. We don’t. We don’t know what we’re feeding to our children and grandchildren.
Richard Heinberg

Richard Heinberg at the International Inquiry into 9-11

10 Jul 2004
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An eloquent argument for Peak Oil at International Inquiry into 9-11 at San Francisco
Mike Ruppert

Michael Ruppert at the International Inquiry into 9-11

10 Mar 2003
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Seaking about research done on Peak Oil and names his sources
David Talbot

David Talbot lectures at Simon Fraser University

10 Mar 2001 |
View all related to Climate Change | Corporatism | Democracy | Media and Advertising
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despite the fact that we live in a country with the most radical administration in my memory, possibly in American history, our watchdog media continues to sleep. With the glaring exception of the New York Times, bless their hearts, the media has responded to these developments in the U.S. with a limp and even fawning journalism. The White House press corps dutifully waits each time when Bush deigns to appear before them, to be called upon in order, the order that he has chosen, with the responses that he has prepared. And they lapsed into a cowardly silence when veteran White House reporter Helen Thomas dared to speak up and called President Bush the worst president in U.S. history.
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Richard Heinberg at the Vancouver Planetarium

10 Nov 2000 | |
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We are not ready for the global peak in oil production, which is likely to occur sometime between 2004 and 2010. Natural gas situation is, if anything, even more dire. Natural gas, again, this is from Exxon-Mobil, natural gas demand is increasing more natural gas electric generation plants being built in the States and so on. But natural gas discovery has already peaked. The typical natural gas well in the U.S. is 60% depleted within the first year. That means the industry is running at breakneck speed just to stay even with demand. U.S. natural gas well productivity going down, U.S. imports of natural gas are therefore increasing. This shows 15.4% in 2000, now it’s well up past 16% and where is that natural gas coming from? One guess – Canada.
William Rees

Dr. William Rees' Presentation at the Vancouver Planetarium

31 Dec 2004
View all related to Climate Change | Oil | Resource Depletion
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Discussing oil peak
Kenneth Deffeyes

Kenneth Deffeyes at Ohio Univ. Baker Peace Conference

10 Mar 2001
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Discussing the possibility that conventional oil peaked in 2000