Climate Change

Mike Ruppert

Nine Critical Questions to Ask About Alternative Energy

10 Apr 2004
View all related to Climate Change | Renewables
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Before we instantly accept alternative energy lifeboats that will let us keep our current lifestyles, don't you think it wise to see if they float? Here are nine questions that you must ask of yourself, and anyone who claims that they have found a perfect alternative to oil. After answering these questions, you may have a better idea about whether you want to jump (or throw your family) into something that might sink in short order.
Richard Douthwaite

Richard Douthwaite speaks with Julian Darley (May 2003)

10 Mar 2001
View all related to Climate Change | Local Money
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Argentina is particularly interesting because it illustrates what can happen in a sophisticated country when the economic system collapses. What happened in Argentina, as most people know, was that they tied their currency, the peso, to the U.S. dollar on a rigid one-for-one basis. This worked very well, initially; it cured inflation, which was running at 5000% per annum when they instituted that move; it brought it right down, and it led to a period of prosperity. But other countries in the region devalued their currencies, and consequently the peso rose in value, and Argentine exports became uncompetitive.
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Richard Heinberg at the Vancouver Planetarium

10 Nov 2000 | |
View all related to Climate Change | Oil
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We are not ready for the global peak in oil production, which is likely to occur sometime between 2004 and 2010. Natural gas situation is, if anything, even more dire. Natural gas, again, this is from Exxon-Mobil, natural gas demand is increasing more natural gas electric generation plants being built in the States and so on. But natural gas discovery has already peaked. The typical natural gas well in the U.S. is 60% depleted within the first year. That means the industry is running at breakneck speed just to stay even with demand. U.S. natural gas well productivity going down, U.S. imports of natural gas are therefore increasing. This shows 15.4% in 2000, now it’s well up past 16% and where is that natural gas coming from? One guess – Canada.
William Rees

Dr. William Rees' Presentation at the Vancouver Planetarium

31 Dec 2004
View all related to Climate Change | Oil | Resource Depletion
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Discussing oil peak
Kenneth Deffeyes

Kenneth Deffeyes speaks with Julian Darley

10 Mar 2001 |
View all related to Climate Change | Oil
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The trouble I have with this is feeling that people don't change their minds very often about this, that I wrote in my book, that almost everyone I know, when you first explain to them about Hubbert's peak they have one of two reactions. “Oh yea, of course it's got to be that oil is finite and that we're going to run out of it someday.” And other people say, “Oh, no, no, no, no, we've heard those stories before, they've all been wrong, we'll find new technology, we'll drill a little deeper.” They've got a long list of excuses. In fact my first chapter is a list of excuses on the way I think they won't work. So I also pointed out that the number of people that changed their minds about this after hearing more about the data is essentially zero.
Kenneth Deffeyes

Kenneth Deffeyes at Ohio Univ. Baker Peace Conference

10 Mar 2001
View all related to Climate Change | Oil
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Discussing the possibility that conventional oil peaked in 2000
Michael Klare

Michael Klare speaks with Julian Darley

10 Mar 2001
View all related to Climate Change | Conflict | Oil
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In my mind this is the center of world geopolitical struggle for the next 50 years. This is the pivot of geopolitical struggle, and it's not just the United States that's involved but increasingly China, certainly Russia, Turkey, Israel, Iran and the lessor powers in the region. Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Kuwait, United Arab Emirate's all are part of this mix. All will be jockeying for power and advantage and I think the United States is determined to be the dominate player in this region.
Michael Klare

Michael Klare at Ohio University Baker Peace Conference

10 Mar 2001
View all related to Climate Change | Conflict | Oil
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This is the blueprint that's governing American energy policy. It's been written into law. It has tremendous consequences and we don't know what the rest of it is and the headlines have actually distracted us from the reality of what the report actually is about. The implication from the brew-ha-ha over ANWR is that this report, this policy is actually intended, that the purpose of this policy is to diminish America's dependence on imported oil. You know, you keep hearing that if we drill in ANWR we can reduce our dependence on imported oil. Nothing is further from the truth! The exact opposite is the case. The Cheney plan is a blueprint to increased American dependency on imported oil.
Steven Shrybman

Steven Shrybman speaks with Julian Darley

10 Apr 2004
View all related to Climate Change | Globalization | Natural Gas | Oil | Water
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So one of the things that distinguishes NAFTA from the World Trade Organization agreements is that it includes a chapter that deals explicitly with energy. And the basic rules of trade as they apply to energy in the NAFTA context is that the US is entitled to unlimited access to Canadian natural gas and oil resources at the same price that those resources are made available in Canada and the form in which that's given expression by NAFTA is to impose a ban on government measures.
Richard Heinberg

Petroleum Plateau

10 Mar 2003
View all related to Climate Change | Oil
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The realization that modern industrial society is approaching the peak in available net energy to fuel the economy is a powerful shock to one's entire belief system. It literally changes everything.