Museletter

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Richard Heinberg's MuseLetter #193: It's Happening

28 Apr 2008
View all related to Auto | Coal | Museletter | Peak Oil | technology
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In this month's MuseLetter, Heinberg shares some material from his upcoming book on coal. Also included are his May column for The Ecologist magazine ("What Car do You Drive?"), a Foreword that he wrote for the new edition of Mat Stein’s brilliant book When Technology Fails, and a brief blog for the Post Carbon Institute website.
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MuseLetter #192: Resilient Communities: A Guide to Disaster Management

03 Apr 2008
View all related to community | Museletter | Peak Oil | post carbon cities | resilience | Sustainability
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The following is a proposal to help make communities better able to respond to the coming economic shocks from resource depletion, beginning with Peak Oil, and perhaps also to shocks from other causes (such as the ongoing subprime mortgage and credit collapse). Making existing petroleum-reliant communities truly sustainable is a huge task. Virtually every system must be redesigned—from transport to food, sanitation, health care, and manufacturing.
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Richard Heinberg's Museletter: The Great Coal Rush (and Why It Will Fail)

04 Feb 2008
View all related to Coal | Museletter | Resource Depletion
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This MuseLetter, and several more during the next few months, will be chapters for a forthcoming book on coal, to be published by Post Carbon Press. This month's issue is the book's Introduction. The world appears poised for a headlong sprint toward greater dependence on coal. This book's purpose is to examine one crucial question that will shape this next great coal rush: How much is left?

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Heinberg: Peak Everything Economics, or, What Do You Call This Mess?

23 Jan 2008
View all related to economics | economy | Money | Museletter | Resource Depletion
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It's becoming increasingly clear that 2008 will be a catastrophic year for the US economy, and therefore probably for that of the world as a whole. The reasons boil down to two: continuing and snowballing fallout from the subprime mortgage fiasco (exacerbated by an orgy of debt-leveraging), and record-high, continuously advancing oil prices. This brief portion of the February Museletter is so topical it bears immediate posting.

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Richard Heinberg's Museletter: The Future of Technology

10 Jan 2008
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This morning I was awakened at 6:30 by a robot; - not a wheeled electronic valet named "Robbie" bringing me orange juice and toast, but an automated fax machine dialing my phone number and beeping expectantly into my answering machine, hoping to provide me with some helpful advertisement. While I won't go so far as to say the experience ruined my day, it nevertheless cost me some sleep and provoked me to reflect somewhat darkly on our species' present and future relationship with technology.

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Richard Heinberg's Museletter: What Will We Eat as the Oil Runs Out?

03 Dec 2007
View all related to Food Security | Local Food | Museletter | Oil | Peak Oil | Relocalization | Resource Depletion
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Our global food system faces a crisis of unprecedented scope. This crisis, which threatens to imperil the lives of hundreds of millions and possibly billions of human beings, consists of four simultaneously colliding dilemmas, all arising from our relatively recent pattern of dependence on depleting fossil fuels.

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Richard Heinberg's Museletter: Big Melt Meets Big Empty

04 Nov 2007
View all related to Climate Change | Museletter | Oil | Politics | Resource Depletion
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"The only way to avert massive social chaos and famine as extraction levels decline will be to devote public capital domestically toward the building of low energy infrastructure (e.g., electrified rail networks, trolley lines, wind farms) while moving many people to rural areas and teaching them to farm sustainably. Production and consumption will have to be largely re-localized, essential goods rationed by quota. Basically the same thing will have to happen in the poor nations."

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Richard Heinberg's Museletter: Powerdown Revisited/As the World Burns

14 Oct 2007
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It’s getting pretty damn obvious that the world is sliding head-first into the abyss at an accelerating rate, with most Americans as oblivious as ever. Museletter #186 has been completed in two parts - both of which are now available.

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Richard Heinberg's Museletter #185: Peak Everything

03 Sep 2007
View all related to Climate Change | Coal | Museletter | Natural Gas | Nuclear | Oil | Resource Depletion
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This book is not an introduction to the subject of Peak Oil; several existing volumes serve that function (including my own The Party's Over: Oil, War and the Fate of Industrial Societies). Instead it addresses the social and historical context in which the event is occurring, and explores how we can reorganize our thinking and action in several critical areas in order to better navigate this perilous time.

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Richard Heinberg's Museletter- The View From Oil's Peak

09 Aug 2007
View all related to Museletter | Oil | Resource Depletion
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How near is the global peak? Today the majority of oil-producing nations are seeing reduced output: in 2006, BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy reported declines in 27 of the 51 producing nations listed. In some instances, these declines will be temporary and are occurring because of lack of investment in production technology or domestic political problems. But in most instances the decline results from factors of geology: while older oil fields continue to yield crude, beyond a certain point it becomes impossible to maintain maximum flow rates by any available means. And so as years go by there are fewer nations in the category of oil exporters and more nations in the category of oil importers.