Natural Gas

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Matt Simmons speaks with Julian Darley about natural gas

19 May 2004 |
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Every serious long-term-energy forecast comes to the same conclusion, that natural gas needs to grow twice as fast as oil, because the whole world has finally realized that natural gas is the world's single-best source of energy; the numbers on the projected demand are just absolutely enormous. What we don't have much data on is on the supply side, because the amount of analysis and data on the supply side for gas pales in comparison to what we have in oil, which isn't very good.
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Matthew R Simmons's 13 Points of Light

17 Apr 2004
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Speaking about new disclosure standards for the oil and gas industry, The 13 Points of Light
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Matt Simmons speaks with Darley about 13 Points of Light

15 Apr 2004
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Speaking about the current state of Oil and Gas reporting and his proposed disclosure standards, the "13 Points of Light"
Steven Shrybman

Steven Shrybman speaks with Julian Darley

10 Apr 2004
View all related to Climate Change | Globalization | Natural Gas | Oil | Water
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So one of the things that distinguishes NAFTA from the World Trade Organization agreements is that it includes a chapter that deals explicitly with energy. And the basic rules of trade as they apply to energy in the NAFTA context is that the US is entitled to unlimited access to Canadian natural gas and oil resources at the same price that those resources are made available in Canada and the form in which that's given expression by NAFTA is to impose a ban on government measures.
David Pursell

David Pursell speaks with Julian Darley

30 Aug 2005
View all related to Climate Change | Coal | Natural Gas | Nuclear
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I would bet that decline in Canadian production certainly spurs that debate, so, those are the things that I look North of the Border and wonder politically how that’s gonna play out, particularly when, you know, if you think about it form an exporting country’s perspective, why are we paying, in Calgary, why are the citizens paying $6 for gas so that those over-consumptive folks South-of-the-border can, you know, drive their SUV’s and heat two homes and all that sort of thing, so…
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Matt Simmons speaks about Bush, Iraq, and more

30 Aug 2005
View all related to Climate Change | Conflict | Natural Gas | Oil
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Discussing oil peak; natural gas; what the President knows; hydrogen; and Iraq
David Pursell

David Pursell speaks with Julian Darley about Natural Gas

30 Aug 2005
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Quite frankly, the Americans in general, are not educated about where those resources come from and what the implications are. You think that’s crazy, having fought 10 years ago in the Middle East because Saddam Hussein took over a key oil exporting country and the situation we have now in Iraq. But quite frankly, the American consumer is a bit of a whiner. They don’t care until prices are high. There are many unfortunate outcomes of the Enron and the trading scandals but I think one of the most unfortunate outcomes is John Q. Public saying that the whole energy crisis was a figment of Enron’s imagination.
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Colin Campbell interviewed by Julian Darley(2002)

30 Aug 2005
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In the way that oil is traded the price is set by the marginal barrel so that a small surplus, or a small shortage, has an entirely disproportionate effect to the overall supply. So there was panic buying in the West and oil - in today’s prices - oil shot up to almost $100 a barrel briefly - and this tipped the world into recession. And so it was about 12 years or so before - and recession then further curbed demand, and demand fell, reduced pressure on price - and so it was about 12 years before the production of oil rose again to the level it had been in 1979.