Oil

Hazel Henderson

Hazel Henderson speaks with Julian Darley

31 Dec 2004
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So one of the moves that some OPEC countries have been making, particularly Venezuela, is to make barter deals, bartering their oil directly for commodities which these countries can’t otherwise sell. And the Venezuelans have made about thirteen of these bilateral barter deals with developing countries. And this of course has angered the Bush administration, particularly the deal they made with Cuba, which was that the Venezuelans sent Cubans oil, as it’s very close to them as you know, in exchange for Cuban doctors and paramedics paid by the Cubans who are on loan to Venezuela to set up public health clinics in rural villages in Venezuela.
Richard Heinberg

Richard Heinberg speaks with Darley about The Party's Over

31 Dec 2004
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Now the real tragedy of Cornucopism, the way of thinking that says there is always going to be more and tomorrow is going to be a brighter day for the economy and new technologies will always come to rescue us. The real tragedy of Cornucopism is that it’s telling us that that kind of sacrifice is not necessary. That we are really not going to have to face at any point hard choices regarding resource depletion population pressure. And so we are not as a result of our cultural belief in Cornucopian ideology, we are unlikely ever to undertake those kinds of coordinated efforts and deliberate sacrifices that will be necessary to make that transition.
Colin Campbell (2002-12)

Colin Campbell speaks with Darley about South China Seas

30 Aug 2005
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It’s often the case where territory is somehow closed for artificial reasons it’s always perceived to have enormous oil prospects. There’s a place called the Spratly Islands which is east of Viet Nam, which is claimed by the Philippines and China and Viet Nam and Malaysia, and goodness knows who. Somehow this has got the reputation of just being full of oil but there’s really no real firm evidence that that’s the case. It’s just that people always think that when there’s some reason they can’t get there. So there have been some finds made offshore, smallish, and I don’t think it’s going to be a major oil province.
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Matt Simmons speaks about Bush, Iraq, and more

30 Aug 2005
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Discussing oil peak; natural gas; what the President knows; hydrogen; and Iraq
James Galbraith

James K Galbraith at the Austin UT Oil Peak Colloquium

10 Mar 2001
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Discussing economic issues arising from oil peak
 Blank (no image)

The yawning heights - looking out from the great oil peak

10 Apr 2004
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The end of cheap oil is upon us. It is the real underlying reason for the US attack on Iraq. This talk helps explain why the end of cheap oil will soon be permament, not just another oil shock, and why the only long-term answer is to reduce hydrocarbon consumption radically.
Julian Darley

Julian Darley's Letter from Earth #1

30 Aug 2005
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Why the end of cheap oil will soon be permament and why the only long-term answer is to reduce hydrocarbon consumption radically
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Colin Campbell interviewed by Julian Darley(2002)

30 Aug 2005
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In the way that oil is traded the price is set by the marginal barrel so that a small surplus, or a small shortage, has an entirely disproportionate effect to the overall supply. So there was panic buying in the West and oil - in today’s prices - oil shot up to almost $100 a barrel briefly - and this tipped the world into recession. And so it was about 12 years or so before - and recession then further curbed demand, and demand fell, reduced pressure on price - and so it was about 12 years before the production of oil rose again to the level it had been in 1979.