Permaculture

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David Holmgren speaks with GPM's Julian Darley

29 Aug 2004 |
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David Holmgren, co-originator of permaculture, talks in depth about the implications of peak oil for for food security and a post-petroleum future.
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Jules Dervaes of Path to Freedom

25 Sep 2004 | |
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Jules Dervaes of Path to Freedom speaks about their urban homestead project which incorporates many back-to-basic practices, permaculture methods, and appropriate technologies. On a typical small city lot, they produce 6,000 pounds of food per year.
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Patricia Allison at Peak Oil-Community Solutions Conference

14 Nov 2004
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The principles of permaculture are vital in the transition to a sustainable post-oil society.
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Patricia Allison

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She has taught Permaculture throughout the United States and Mexico, and has facilitated Dances of Universal Peace, prayer lodges, and local and continental Bioregional Congresses.
David Holmgren

David Holmgren

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David Holmgren, Co-Originator of the Permaculture Concept and Author of Permaculture: Principals and Pathways Beyond Sustainability
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David Holmgren speaks with Adam Fenderson

30 Dec 1969
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permaculture started as a critique of industrial forms of agriculture to see if it could be redesigned using natural principles. The idea grew that traditional peasant agriculture was labor intensive, industrial agriculture was fossil fuel intensive and permaculture was design and information intensive. The central problem with agriculture (industrial agriculture) is not so much its damage to the productive base, although that is very, very important—the main problem is just that vast amounts of non-renewable energy are used to support an essentially renewable system that provides human food, year after year after year.